the bible

I love stories set in Bible times. I love film adaptations of Biblical events. Watching The Bible miniseries recently, I nearly died of happiness to finally find a historically-accurate representation of Pontius Pilate.

Yet, as happens each time anyone writes a book or films a movie about the Bible, there are naysayers out there claiming we shouldn’t do these things. It adds to scripture! It’s like making a graven image!

I completely disagree.

Fiction is fiction. No one claims it isn’t. By watching an interpretation of scripture I’m not inserting pages into my Bible, or even saying this particular elaboration is what happened. The Bible flat out tells us Jesus did many more signs and wonders and miracles that the disciples didn’t write down. It isn’t sinful to imagine, to create, to revel in the wonder of God through fiction or film. Stupid as some of us may be, we all know that actor isn’t really Jesus and the story isn’t how it really happened.

In fact, I would take it a step further and say that denying our creativity is to deny how we are made in God’s image in the first place. I don’t think that verse in scripture talks about our physical appearance, but instead our consciousness: our spirit, our soul, and our creativity. Like God, we want to create. We sing, we write, we build, we paint. God has one task for us on this earth: to serve Him. That means loving one another and making disciples. If He didn’t want us to create, He wouldn’t have made us like Him. He wants us to use the gifts He’s given us to evangelize.

Some of us are too shy to go door to door and talk about Christ, but we can write a novel that will show Him to people through a historical event. We can film a two hour movie or a ten hour miniseries that shares our beliefs in more coherent, memorable ways than if we opened our mouth. God makes us different from one another for a reason, so He has missionaries in all aspects of society. We should be careful in condemning one another’s individual attempts to honor our Creator.