The first time I saw this movie I must have been in a bad mood. You know, the kind where not even the offer of chocolate cheers you up? Because I hated it. I thought it was mean, and while that still stands (some of the “pranks” are mean) there is rather a sweetness and sincerity to the ending that kind of overrules the whole “sabotaging each other” bit.

The story revolves around two best friends who have been planning for their weddings their entire lives. Liv is a blonde bombshell who rules the world… err… settles nasty divorce cases at a high-profile law firm. Emma is a mild-mannered teacher constantly manipulated by her coworkers. Both of them get engaged about the same time, and start planning their weddings. Everything is fantastic fun until their shared wedding planner accidentally books their weddings for the same date at the same venue — the Plaza. Ever since a childhood experience seeing a Bride at the Plaza, that has been their dream. Both of them refuse to back down and that’s when the backstabbing, hair-dying, rumor-spreading, and face-stuffing starts.

First, I don’t buy the plot. I have a best friend and nothing would make us fight with each other on this level. I mea, really? Blue hair dye and trying to make your friend gain weight so she can’t wear her dress? I can see some nasty e-mails or utter silence for awhile, but these girls go out of the way to “wreck” each other’s weddings, making themselves and everyone else miserable at the same time. That aside, I can see where cattiness on this level could exist. Hell hath no fury and all that.

When the movie came out, there were several different reactions. The one I was most acquainted with was the “feminist” response, which was to be offended not only at a movie that paints women in such a negative, backbiting light (… yeah…) but that also implies their entire world revolved around getting married and having a wedding. Now, I am a feminist in the classic sense of the word (or maybe “suffragette” would be more appropriate?) but not the “recent” interpretation of it. I care about real feminist issues as opposed to merely the right to “get rid of” your inconvenient pregnancy. But I don’t think having a movie revolving around planning your wedding your entire life is “anti-feminist.”

Most women do care about their wedding.

Most women do want to get married.

Most women do scrapbook and save pictures and ideas and harbor dreams about the day they say “I do” (hopefully for forever).

I’m enough of a feminist to say — if that’s what you want to do, go for it. Plan your wedding in advance. Have that scrapbook if you want it. Buy that gorgeous white Vera Wang dress. Be excited about getting married. If your greatest ambition is to get married and have kids, awesome! Good for you! Just make sure you pick the right man and make sure you are the right woman. Acting mature helps, a trait neither of these leading ladies exhibited. Liv’s future husband was supportive of her but also encouraged her not to go off the deep end. Emma’s did nothing but harp at her. Funny when you consider his proposal came first; he was the one who really wanted to get married, but Liv’s future hubby is the one who likes her for who she is, so he’s the keeper.

Growing up, I didn’t really plan my wedding or dream about my wedding or even think about my wedding. I never really even thought about having a husband. I was too busy plotting how to be an author, and admiring the marriage-free reign of Elizabeth I. So obviously, weddings are not my dream. But that’s not to say if I ever do get married, I won’t have fun planning what to wear. Somehow, a traditional dress just doesn’t seem my style. I hope my future husband likes Phantom of the Opera, because he might get stuck with a replica Christine wedding gown…